Polish visa requirement

New Polish Visa requirement

If you are on your way to get Polish citizenship, or want o get a Polish citizenship as an entry for the EU, then there is a new requirement you should be aware of.

If you want to stay in Poland as you are waiting for a Permanent visa you need twenty-five Euros a day for every day of your temporary visa.  This is a new law about three weeks ago.

The purpose of this new EU Visa requirement

The point of this rule is twofold. First, they want to make sure you can live in Poland without becoming dependent on your host EU country, that is Poland.

You are a guest and you are not a citizen and should not expect hard working people to support you just because.  Therefore this new Polish visa rule is very reasonable.  I think it takes more than twenty-five Euros a day to live in Poland so it is a very low barrier to entry.

When I applied for my visa for Poland the police reviewed my financial records and so did the city offices.  Now they have just made it more formal.  So it is not against anyone, it is just so you will not fall into trouble when you are in a foreign country in the EU.

The second thing this does is cut down on the number of increasing false marriages to get a visa for Poland.  One-quarter to one-half of the marriages in Poland to foreigners are fake, with the sole purpose of getting an EU citizenship.

This is very wrong.  People use the system and Poland is making it harder and illegal to do so.  If you get caught in some agreement, even if it simply verbal,  you could go to prison. And I think you should.

The foreigner pays some Polish girl ten thousand dollars and she get married he get citizenship and he is off to London.  The Polish girl has money they guy has a EU visa then and EU citizenship.

This is very unfair and very illegal.

Problem with false Polish visas

My parents were technically Polish, my family is Polish ( I am married) I have lived in Poland for about six years, I speak Polish and have worked legally in Poland. To get a Polish citizenship it took me about six year..  This was the fast track because my blood is Polish and under Polish law I am technically Polish, just not confirmed.

One guy from Peru it took him nineteen years.  Therefore, the Polish courts look at every case carefully.  If you are from Ukraine and married to a Polish citizen I think this is not a big deal as Poland and Ukraine share a similar history.

But if you are from Africa or the Middle East they will view your case with care because although some of these guys are sincere, many just want to escape their own countries for some reason.  I have been to Africa and the Middle East and it is beautiful, so I do not understand it.

In fact, many Polish girls are abandoned by their new husbands once they get a Polish visa.  And the Polish girl can not get remarried as the guy is no where to be found for a Polish civil law divorce.

I think this is funny and should teach Polish girls not to enter into such agreements based on money.  Marriage is for love.

New Polish visa law is good

I think this law is good to require on the Polish visa application twenty-five Euros a day.  It should be more.  If you are staying in Poland for One hundred days this means two thousand five hundred Euros you have to prove.

Student Visa for Poland

Student visas of course is different.  They have different rules, laws and regulations.  The above rule is connected to those who want to get a “visa for Poland” through a civil marriage agreement or contract.

If you have question about this issue or citizenship for the EU just ask. I am not an expert or a lawyer but I might know just enough to point you in the right direction.

10 Replies to “Polish visa requirement”

  1. But it’s only for non-EU, cos EU-Citizens don’t need to pay for permission to work/study/live in Poland…

  2. i just currently came back from poland and i was in love of the country, i wanna work in poland but i some tips on how to accomplish it, i live in Guatemala city in central america (the other side of the world) and would like to apply working on Poland, what do i require to do so? your help will be apreciated.

  3. Hello, my son wants to attend a college in Poland. We are not familiar as to what to do. I’ve read it’s difficult to get a Polish visa? We are born in the U.S. But his grandparents ~ my parents were from Poland. My question is what do I need to do to help him get a visa. Any help is greatly appreciated. We have a few different colleges. How much is cost and chances of him getting a visa, etc. We’ve traveled to Poland a few times to visit distant relatives but prefer not to involve the if possible. And yes I speak Polish since im 1st generation American but my son does not.

    1. If you are a student you get a student visa. But if you can want to get a Polish greencard it is not an issue. I have written a lot about it. You need to contact the Polish embassy and they can guide you but basically in the Polish constitution if you can prove you are of Polish blood, you do not even have to speak the language, you get a greencard. I created a family tree in excel and then collected all the documents I could find to create a factual history. With these birth and marriage documents you can fill out an application and it will not be an issue with time.

  4. Hello, it has been my dream to immigrate to Poland. I would like to ask whether it would be possible for me as far as my profile is concerned. My profile is as follows:

    I am 21 years old. I was borned in Hong Kong with the nationality of British National (Overseas) (please notice the difference of mine in comparison to Chinese passport). At 7 years old I went to USA (with student visa). I stayed there for 5 years and I went to London for my studies (student visa). After I finished my high school I went to Germany for my university education. Now I am in France doing my semester abroad. I speak 6 languages: English, German, French, a bit Italian, a bit Cantonese and Chinese also.

    From different webpages I have come up with a couple of ideas. Either opening a company in Poland or find a job. But as far as the economic situation is concerned, its seems to be quite difficult to find a job because I don’t speak Polish yet. I learn fast though. I have been 2 years studying in Germany and I already passed TestDaf, a German test which proofs my German level is good enough to study and work in a complete German environment.

    Do you have any suggestion for me? Thanks a lot.
    P.S money is not a problem for me.

    1. I would get a job teaching one of your languages from English, German to Chinese at a language school and that would allow you to get a visa for work. From there you can work on residency. Your main skill is languages, something that is in need in Poland.

      If you are a British national you might be able to live in Poland anyway, as the laws with BNO are very unclear in Europe.

      1. Hello, thanks a lot for your quick reply. There are a couple of things I would also like to ask.

        First, I do understand that I speak quite a lot of languages. But since I do not speak Polish at all, would it be difficult to find a job as a language teacher? Would the procedure of getting a work visa difficult?

        Secondly, I would like to ask your opinion on Polish culture. Do you think integration is easy? Do you think people respect foreigners? Do you think local people are open to other cultures? Please see to it that I wish to immigrate to Poland is because I admire its culture and I want to live there, marry a Polish girl and have my family there. I do not immigrate for economic reasons. After all, if required, I could find a job in Germany as well.

        Once again, thank you.

        1. Teaching English is easy and the best way to find a job or any specialized language you speak. If you are an EU citizen you need nothing, just go and work. If you are not you need a work visa which you apply for at the office or foreigners with a company to sponsor you. Poles like foreigners generally. I am American and Americaland is a melting pot, and Poland is not, but they accept foreigners as something interesting or exotic in most cases.

          1. Thanks a lot for your information and encouragements. I feel really lucky that I can find this site.
            Thank you once again,
            Walter

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